EAU Press Releases

The EAU regularly publishes press releases. Other news can be found in the News section or in the EAU News mailing. Stay up to date, and subscribe to the EAU Press Mailing List to receive the latest EAU press releases and other relevant information. Please subscribe here.

First accurate data showing that male to female transgender surgery can lead to a better life

Scientists have developed a transgender-specific questionnaire, which confirms for the first time that gender surgery significantly improves quality of life for the majority of patients. The study shows that 80% of male-to-female patients perceived themselves as women post-surgery. However, the quality of life of transgender individuals is still significantly lower than the general population.

Smart software can diagnose prostate cancer as well as a pathologist

Chinese scientists and clinicians have developed a learning artificial intelligence system which can diagnose and identify cancerous prostate samples as accurately as any pathologist. This holds out the possibility of streamlining and eliminating variation in the process of cancer diagnosis. It may also help overcome any local shortage of trained pathologists. In the longer term, it may lead to automated or partially-automated prostate cancer diagnosis.

Major study shows x5 greater suicide rate in patients with urological cancers

A major UK survey has shown that patients with urological cancer such as prostate, bladder or kidney cancer are five times more likely to commit suicide than people without cancer. The analysis also shows that cancer patients generally are around three times more likely to commit suicide than the general population and that the proportion of attempted suicides which result in a completed or successful suicide was higher in cancer patients, with a higher proportion still in patients with urological cancers.

A quarter of Penis Cancer sufferers don’t get recommended treatment – halving the survival rate

A major international survey has found that around a quarter of patients are not receiving the recommended treatment for cancer of the penis. It also found that these patients had half the survival rate of those who were treated according to guidelines. The study, presented at the EAU conference in Copenhagen, finds that non-adherence is partly due to patients refusing treatment, or doctors being reluctant to treat appropriately or being unfamiliar with the best procedures.

4 in 10 men may not be receiving adequate prostate cancer treatment in England

Almost 4 in 10 men with high-risk or locally advanced prostate cancer (prostate cancer that is likely to or that has already spread beyond the prostate) may be “undertreated”* by the failure to use radiotherapy or in some circumstances surgery, according to results from the National Prostate Cancer Audit (NPCA). The most common form of under-treatment is the use of hormonal treatments alone without additional radiotherapy or surgery. This means that some of the men diagnosed with high-risk or locally advanced prostate cancer may not be receiving the best treatment, according to research presented at the European Association of Urology conference in London in March 2017.

Concern over high US prescribing levels of common drug linked to dementia

A new analysis raises concern over high prescription rates in the USA of a common drug used to treat overactive bladder. The drug, oxybutynin, when taken orally, is consistently linked with cognitive impairment and dementia in the elderly. The analysis shows that oxybutynin, is prescribed in more than a quarter of cases of overactive bladder (27.3%), even though other more suitable drugs are available. This work is presented at the European Association of Urology conference in London, where concerns are also being expressed about the lack of funded alternatives to oxybutynin in Europe.

Does disturbed breathing while asleep make some people pee more at night?

A new study has found that reducing obstructive sleep apnea (where patients have difficulty in breathing while asleep -often associated with loud snoring) can reduce the need to get up and pee at night (nocturia). This study confirms the link between apnea and nocturia, and supports the idea that lifestyle management may contribute to reducing nocturia in certain cases. Nocturia affects more than half of men and women over the age of 50 ref1 and is reported as the most irritating of all voiding symptomsref2.