EAU Press Releases

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MRI use may “change the equation” for prostate cancer screening

Screening for prostate cancer is controversial. It can save lives, but it can also lead to unnecessary diagnoses, followed by surgical or radiation procedures, which themselves may lead to severe side-effects. Now a new study, coming from the Dutch part of the European Randomised study for the Screening of Prostate Cancer (ERSPC) has found that MRI-based screening can reduce overdiagnosis by 50% and reduce unnecessary biopsies by 70%, potentially changing the equation for prostate cancer screening. This work, the first to confirm that the use of MRI in a population-based screening setting may be viable, is presented at the EAU conference in London.

 

Stem cells shown to restore erection capability in men with erectile dysfunction

New clinical trial results show that stem cells can restore sufficient erectile function to allow previously impotent men to have spontaneous intercourse. This is the first time stem cell therapy has produced patients who have recovered sufficient erectile function to enable intercourse. This is an early trial, which was primarily addressing safety and dosage (a Phase 1 trial), so the results need to be interpreted accordingly.

Biosensor chips identify effective antibiotic treatment up to x8 faster than current methods

Scientists have piloted silicon biosensor chips which can rapidly identify the best antibiotics for treating bacterial infections. The system can direct clinicians to the best antibiotic treatment in around 2 to 6 hours, rather than upwards of 2 days which is typical of conventional tests. The new technology, which is still in development, is being presented at the European Association of Urology congress in London.

Study shows patients prefer iPads to doctors when discussing surgery

Often patients undergo procedures without real informed consent being achieved due to technical language, jargon and time pressure, with up to half of patients finding it difficult to understand what their doctor tells them [1, 2]. Now a group of Australian doctors has prepared patients for surgery using iPads, and found that patients’ understanding was much better than after a face-to-face consultation.

Men who choose active surveillance instead of radiotherapy or surgery for low-risk prostate cancer have similar Quality of Life as men without cancer

Choosing ongoing monitoring instead of immediate curative treatment (surgery or radiotherapy) leads to a better overall quality of life for men with low-risk prostate cancer. In fact, the Quality of life (QoL) is about the same as for men who do not have cancer.  These are the findings of a new long-term study comparing Active Surveillance, immediate curative treatment, and a reference group of men without cancer, presented at the Annual Congress of the European Association of Urology in Munich.

Study finds kidney transplant donation rates vary widely across Europe

A new Europe-wide survey shows significant country-to-country differences in rates of kidney transplant donors. The survey shows for example within the EU, there is a x5 variation in the number of kidney donors per country (per head of population). This variation is probably due to different legal and social standards across Europe.

Can we predict aggressiveness of prostate cancer before surgery with a blood test?

Prostate cancer is the most common male cancer, with 400,000 new cases every year in Europe. The success of surgery depends on a variety of factors.  Now a new study from scientists in Milan has shown that for local prostate cancers treated with radical prostatectomy, you can preoperatively predict the aggressiveness of the prostatic disease, via a simple blood test.

How a bad night’s sleep might worsen cancer development

Recent studies have indicated that patients with sleep apnea may be associated with worse cancer outcomes. Now a new animal study, presented at the Annual Congress of the European Association of Urology in Munich, uncovers a possible mechanism which may underlie this link.