EAU Press Releases

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Wives of many prostate cancer sufferers made ill or feel undermined by the disease

Many wives of advanced prostate cancer sufferers feel that their lives are being undermined by their husband’s illness, with nearly half reporting that their own health suffered. In addition a focus subgroup has revealed that many feel isolated and fearful, and worry about the role change in their lives as their husband’s cancer advances. This study, developed with the wives of men with metastatic prostate cancer who were being treated with hormone therapy, is amongst the first carried out on how prostate cancer affects the partners of sufferers.  It was presented yesterday at the EAU conference in Copenhagen.

Major study shows prostate MRI reveals more cancers which need treatment, and reduces overdiagnosis compared to standard biopsy

A large international study has shown that an MRI scan can reduce the number of invasive prostate biopsies by up to 28%. The PRECISION1 trial shows that using MRI to target prostate biopsies leads to more of the harmful prostate cancers, and fewer harmless cancers being diagnosed. Given that more than a million men in Europe undergo a prostate biopsy every year, the authors believe that this work could change clinical practice. The results are presented at the European Association of Urology Congress in Copenhagen, with simultaneous publication in the New England Journal of Medicine2.

First accurate data showing that male to female transgender surgery can lead to a better life

Scientists have developed a transgender-specific questionnaire, which confirms for the first time that gender surgery significantly improves quality of life for the majority of patients. The study shows that 80% of male-to-female patients perceived themselves as women post-surgery. However, the quality of life of transgender individuals is still significantly lower than the general population.

Smart software can diagnose prostate cancer as well as a pathologist

Chinese scientists and clinicians have developed a learning artificial intelligence system which can diagnose and identify cancerous prostate samples as accurately as any pathologist. This holds out the possibility of streamlining and eliminating variation in the process of cancer diagnosis. It may also help overcome any local shortage of trained pathologists. In the longer term, it may lead to automated or partially-automated prostate cancer diagnosis.

Major study shows x5 greater suicide rate in patients with urological cancers

A major UK survey has shown that patients with urological cancer such as prostate, bladder or kidney cancer are five times more likely to commit suicide than people without cancer. The analysis also shows that cancer patients generally are around three times more likely to commit suicide than the general population and that the proportion of attempted suicides which result in a completed or successful suicide was higher in cancer patients, with a higher proportion still in patients with urological cancers.

A quarter of Penis Cancer sufferers don’t get recommended treatment – halving the survival rate

A major international survey has found that around a quarter of patients are not receiving the recommended treatment for cancer of the penis. It also found that these patients had half the survival rate of those who were treated according to guidelines. The study, presented at the EAU conference in Copenhagen, finds that non-adherence is partly due to patients refusing treatment, or doctors being reluctant to treat appropriately or being unfamiliar with the best procedures.

4 in 10 men may not be receiving adequate prostate cancer treatment in England

Almost 4 in 10 men with high-risk or locally advanced prostate cancer (prostate cancer that is likely to or that has already spread beyond the prostate) may be “undertreated”* by the failure to use radiotherapy or in some circumstances surgery, according to results from the National Prostate Cancer Audit (NPCA). The most common form of under-treatment is the use of hormonal treatments alone without additional radiotherapy or surgery. This means that some of the men diagnosed with high-risk or locally advanced prostate cancer may not be receiving the best treatment, according to research presented at the European Association of Urology conference in London in March 2017.