EAU Press Releases

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Hormonal treatment may trigger depression in men with prostate cancer

Men who receive anti-hormonal treatment after having their prostate removed are 80% more likely to suffer from depression than men who don’t receive this treatment. This leads researchers to suggest that patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy should be monitored for post-surgical depression. This is presented at the European Association of Urology congress in Barcelona.

Scientists identify compounds in coffee which may inhibit prostate cancer

For the first time, scientists have identified compounds found in coffee which may inhibit the growth of prostate cancer. This is a pilot study, carried out on drug-resistant cancer cells in cell culture and in a mouse model; it has not yet been tested in humans. This work is presented at the European Association of Urology congress in Barcelona, after publication in the peer-reviewed journal The Prostate*.

Mental health state associated with higher death rates for prostate and other urological cancers

Patients with prostate, bladder, or kidney cancers are at greater risk of dying if they have had psychiatric care prior to the cancer treatment. In addition, patients with these cancers show greater suicide risk than the general population, even once the data is corrected for previous psychiatric care. These are the main findings of a new study presented at the European Association of Urology congress in Barcelona. They highlight the need for psychiatric care to be integrated into cancer treatment.

Testosterone slows prostate cancer recurrence in low-risk patients

In the largest such study so far undertaken, US researchers have shown that testosterone replacement slows the recurrence of prostate cancer in low-risk patients. This may call into question the general applicability of Nobel-Prize winning hormonal prostate treatment. The work is presented at the European Association of Urology congress in Barcelona.

Even younger nightshift workers shown to need to pee more, worsening quality of life

Millions of people work nights, but increasingly scientists are finding that night work is associated with health problems. Now a group of Italian scientists has found that nightshift workers also need to pee more, leading to a deteriorating quality of life for many workers, including care workers. This is also true of younger subjects, who would not normally be expected to report an overactive bladder. This work is reported at the European Association of Urology Congress in Barcelona.

Study suggests personality tests may improve care for prostate cancer patients

Scientists have found that men with high neuroticism – between a quarter and a fifth of men in developed countries – are significantly more likely to suffer from adverse events such as erectile dysfunction and incontinence, which may put their recovery from prostate cancer surgery at risk. The researchers say that this means cancer teams may need to consider testing for personality types to try to ensure that patients being treated for prostate cancer receive the best care. This work is presented at the European Association of Urology Congress in Barcelona.

Early menopause in smokers linked to bladder cancer

Research shows that experiencing menopause before the age of 45 is associated with a higher risk of bladder cancer. This higher risk was notable if the woman is a smoker. The study, which looked at health outcomes of more than 220,000 US Nurses, is presented at the European Association of Urology congress in Barcelona. Bladder cancer is the 6th most common cancer diagnosed in Europe*. It is more common in men than in women, but women are more likely to suffer from advanced bladder cancer and are less likely to survive than men. Around 27,000 European women and 19,000 US women are diagnosed with bladder cancer each year.

Wives of many prostate cancer sufferers made ill or feel undermined by the disease

Many wives of advanced prostate cancer sufferers feel that their lives are being undermined by their husband’s illness, with nearly half reporting that their own health suffered. In addition a focus subgroup has revealed that many feel isolated and fearful, and worry about the role change in their lives as their husband’s cancer advances. This study, developed with the wives of men with metastatic prostate cancer who were being treated with hormone therapy, is amongst the first carried out on how prostate cancer affects the partners of sufferers.  It was presented yesterday at the EAU conference in Copenhagen.

Major study shows prostate MRI reveals more cancers which need treatment, and reduces overdiagnosis compared to standard biopsy

A large international study has shown that an MRI scan can reduce the number of invasive prostate biopsies by up to 28%. The PRECISION1 trial shows that using MRI to target prostate biopsies leads to more of the harmful prostate cancers, and fewer harmless cancers being diagnosed. Given that more than a million men in Europe undergo a prostate biopsy every year, the authors believe that this work could change clinical practice. The results are presented at the European Association of Urology Congress in Copenhagen, with simultaneous publication in the New England Journal of Medicine2.